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OpenEXR

ILM's OpenEXR has become a software industry standard for HDR image files, especially because of its flexible and expandable structure.

OpenEXR files can store values in the entire floating point space, positive as well as negative numbers.

Apart from reading all OpenEXR file types, with RGBA and optional Z saved, Blender supports OpenEXR in two ways:

Render Output

Available options for OpenEXR render output are:

Half
Saves images in a custom 16 bits per channel floating point format. This reduces the actual "bit depth" to 10 bits, with a 5 bits power value and 1 bit sign.
Zbuf
Save the depth information. In Blender this now is written in floats too, denoting the exact distance from the camera in "Blender unit" values.
Preview
On rendering animations (or single frames via command line), Blender saves the same image also as a JPEG, for quick preview or download.
Compression (this button is below the Image menu button, default set to "None")
  • PIZ, lossless wavelet compression. Compresses images with grain well.
  • ZIP, standard lossless compression using zlib
  • RLE, runlength encoded, lossless, works well when scanlines have same values.
  • PXR24. lossy algorithm from Pixar, converting 32 bits floats to 24 bits floats.

Multi-layer, Multi-pass, tile-based files

An OpenEXR file can hold unlimited layers and passes, stored hierarchically. This feature now is in use for the "Save Buffers" render option. This option doesn't allocate the entire final Render Result before render (which can have many layers and passes), but saves for each tile the intermediate result to a single OpenEXR file in the default Blender 'temp' directory.

When rendering is finished, after all render data has been freed, this then is read back entirely in memory.



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This is the old manual!
For the current 2.7x manual see http://www.blender.org/manual/


User Manual

World and Ambient Effects

World

Introduction
World Background

Ambient Effects

Mist
Stars (2.69)


Game Engine

Introduction

Introduction to the Game Engine
Game Logic Screen Layout

Logic

Logic Properties and States
The Logic Editor

Sensors

Introduction to Sensors
Sensor Editing
Common Options
-Actuator Sensor
-Always Sensor
-Collision Sensor
-Delay Sensor
-Joystick Sensor
-Keyboard Sensor
-Message Sensor
-Mouse Sensor
-Near Sensor
-Property Sensor
-Radar Sensor
-Random Sensor
-Ray Sensor
-Touch Sensor

Controllers

Introduction
Controller Editing
-AND Controller
-OR Controller
-NAND Controller
-NOR Controller
-XOR Controller
-XNOR Controller
-Expression Controller
-Python Controller

Actuators

Introduction
Actuator Editing
Common Options
-2D Filters Actuator
-Action Actuator
-Camera Actuator
-Constraint Actuator
-Edit Object Actuator
-Game Actuator
-Message Actuator
-Motion Actuator
-Parent Actuator
-Property Actuator
-Random Actuator
-Scene Actuator
-Sound Actuator
-State Actuator
-Steering Actuator
-Visibility Actuator

Game Properties

Introduction
Property Editing

Game States

Introduction

Camera

Introduction
Camera Editing
Stereo Camera
Dome Camera

World

Introduction

Physics

Introduction
Material Physics
No Collision Object
Static Object
Dynamic Object
Rigid Body Object
Soft Body Object
Vehicle Controller
Sensor Object
Occluder Object

Path Finding

Navigation Mesh Modifier

Game Performance

Introduction
System
Display
Framerate and Profile
Level of Detail

Python API

Introduction
Bullet physics
VideoTexture

Deploying

Standalone Player
Licensing of Blender Game

Android Support

Android Game development