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Buttons and Controls

Buttons and other controls can be found in almost every Window of the Blender interface. The different types of controls are described below.

Operation Buttons

Operation button

These are buttons that perform an operation when clicked with LMB Template-LMB.png. They can be identified by their gray color in the default Blender scheme.

Pressing CtrlC over these buttons copies their python command into the clipboard which can be used in the python console or in the text editor when writing scripts.

Toggle Buttons

Toggle buttons

Toggle buttons consist of tick boxes. Clicking this type of button will toggle a state but will not perform any operation. In some cases the button is attached to a number button to control the influence of the property.

Radio Buttons

Radio buttons

Radio buttons are used to choose from a small selection of "mutually exclusive" options.

Number Buttons

Number buttons

Number buttons can be identified by their labels, which in most cases contains the name and a colon followed by a number. Number buttons are handled in several ways:

  1. To change the value in steps, click LMB Template-LMB.png on the small triangles on the sides of the button.
  2. To change the value in a wider range, hold down LMB Template-LMB.png and drag the mouse to the left or right. If you hold Ctrl after holding down LMB Template-LMB.png, the value is changed in discrete steps; if you hold ⇧ Shift instead, you'll have finer control over the values.
  3. ↵ Enter or LMB Template-LMB.png lets you enter the value by hand.

When entering values by hand, pressing ↖ Home or ⇥ End will move the cursor to the beginning or the end of the range. Pressing Esc will cancel editing. You can copy the value of a button by hovering over it and pressing CtrlC. Similarly you can paste a copied value with CtrlV.

Expressions

You can also enter expressions such as 3*2 instead of 6. or 5/10+3. Even constants like pi (3.142) or functions like sqrt(2) (square root of 2) may be used.

These expressions are evaluated by python; for all available math expressions see: math module reference

Units

As well as expressions, you can mix units with numbers; for this to work, units need to be set in the scene settings (Metric or Imperial).

Examples of valid units include:

  • 1cm
  • 1m 3mm
  • 1m, 3mm
  • 2ft
  • 3ft/0.5km
  • 2.2mm + 5' / 3" - 2yards

Note that the commas are optional. Also notice how you can mix between metric and imperial even though the display can only show one at a time.

Menu Buttons

Datablock link buttons

Use the Menu buttons to work with items on dynamically created lists. Menu buttons are principally used to link DataBlocks to each other. DataBlocks are items like Meshes, Objects, Materials, Textures, and so on. Linking a Material to an Object will assign that material to the selected Objects.

Datablock link menu with search
  1. The first button (with an icon of the DataBlock type) opens a menu that lets you select the DataBlock to link by clicking LMB Template-LMB.png on the requested item. This list has a search box at the bottom.
  2. The second button displays the name of the linked DataBlock and lets you edit it after clicking LMB Template-LMB.png.
  3. The "+" button duplicates the current DataBlock and applies it.
  4. The "X" button clears the link.

Sometimes there is a list of applied DataBlocks (such as a list of materials used on the object). See DataBlock link buttons above.

  1. To select a datablock, click LMB Template-LMB.png on it.
  2. To add a new section (e.g. material, or particle system), click LMB Template-LMB.png on the "+" button to the right of the list.
  3. To remove a section, click LMB Template-LMB.png on the "-" to the right of the list.


Another type of a Menu button block will show a static list with a range of options. For example, the Add Modifier button will produce a menu with all of the available modifiers.

Modifier options


Unlinked objects

Unlinked data is not lost until you quit Blender. This is a powerful Undo feature. If you delete an object the material assigned to it becomes unlinked, but is still there! You just have to re-link it to another object or supply it with a "Fake User" (i.e. by clicking that option in the corresponding DataBlock in the datablock-view of the Outliner).

Read more about Fake User »


Color Selector Controls

In Blender, you can choose from 4 types of color pickers; the options are
Circle (Default), Square (HS + V) , Square (SV + H) and Square (HV + S)


For more information about how to select the type of color picker, please go to the System preferences page.

All of the Color picker types have the common RGB, HSV and Hex options to show values.
Optionally, depending on the operation, another slider for Alpha control is added at the bottom of the color picker.


Blender uses Floating point values to express colors for RGB and HSV values.
The Hex values are expressed in the same way HTML colors are expressed.


Note that Blender corrects Gamma by default; for more information about how to disable Gamma correction in Blender, please go to the Color Management and Exposure page.
Fig. 2 - Color Picker - Circle
Circle (Default)
A full gamut of colors ranging from center to the borders is always shown; center is a mix of the colors.
Brightness is adjusted with the right bar, from top to bottom.
For operations that are capable of using Alpha, another slider is added at the bottom of the color picker.
See Fig. 2 - Color Picker - Circle
Fig. 3 - Color Picker
Square (HS + V)
Square (HS + V)
Hue, Saturation plus Value A full gamut of colors is always shown.
Brightness is subtracted from the base color chosen on the square of the color picker moving the slider to the left.
For operations that are capable of using Alpha, another slider is added at the bottom of the color picker.
See Fig. 3 - Color Picker - Square (HS + V)
Fig. 4 - Color Picker
Square (SV + H)
Square (SV + H)
Saturation, Value plus Hue A full Gamut of colors is always shown at the bar in the middle of the color picker.
Colors are adjusted using the a range of brightness of the base color chosen at the color bar in the middle of the picker.
For operations that are capable of using Alpha, another slider is added at the bottom of the color picker.
See Fig. 4 - Color Picker - Square (SV + H)
Fig. 5 - Color Picker
Square (HV + S)
Square (HV + S)
Hue, Value and Saturation A full gamut of colors is always shown at the square of the color picker.
Brightness is added to the base color chosen on the square of the color picker moving the slider to the left.
For operations that are capable of using Alpha, another slider is added at the bottom of the color picker.
See Fig. 5 - Color Picker - Square (HV + S)
  • Use Mouse wheel to change overall brightness.
  • Color sliders don't have a default value; the last value before any changes is used instead.

Eye Dropper

The eye dropper allows you to sample a color from anywhere in the Blender window. The Eye Dropper can be accessed from any color picker or by pressing E with the mouse hovering over the color property.

LMB Template-LMB.png and dragging the eyedropper will mix the colors you drag over which can help when sampling noisy imagery. Spacebar resets and starts mixing the colors again.

Cascade Buttons

Occasionally, some buttons actually reveal additional buttons. For example, the Ramps panel has a Cascade button called Ramp that reveals additional buttons dealing with colorbanding. See Colorband before and Colorband after.

Colorband before
Colorband after
Color Ramps
Color Ramps enables the user to specify a range of colors based on color stops.
Color stops are similar to a mark indicating where the exact chosen color should be.
The interval from each of the color stops added to the ramp is a result of the color interpolation and
chosen interpolation method. The available options for Color Ramps are:


Add (Button)
Clicking on this button will add a stop to your custom weight paint map.
The stops are added from the last selected stop to the next one, from left to right and
they will be placed in the middle of both stops.


Delete (Button)
Deletes the selected color stop from the list.


'F' (Button)
Flips the color band, inverting the values of the custom weight paint range.


Numeric Field
Whenever the user adds a color stop to the custom weight paint range, the color stop will receive an index.
This field shows the indexes added (clicking in the arrows until the counter stops), and allows
the user to select the color stop from the list. The selected color stop will be shown with a dashed line.


Interpolation Options
Enables the user to choose from 4 types of calculations for the color interpolation for each color stop.
Available options are:


B-Spline
Uses a B-Spline Interpolation for the color stops.
Cardinal
Uses a Cardinal Interpolation for the color stops.
Linear
Uses a Linear Interpolation for the color stops.
Ease
Uses a Ease Interpolation for the color stops.
Constant
Uses a Constant Interpolation for the color stops.


Position
This slider controls the positioning of the selected color stop in the range.


Color Bar
Opens a color Picker for the user to specify color and Alpha for the selected color stop.
When a color is using Alpha, the Color Bar is then divided in two, with the left side
showing the base color and the right side showing the color with the alpha value.




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This is the old manual!
For the current 2.7x manual see http://www.blender.org/manual/


User Manual

World and Ambient Effects

World

Introduction
World Background

Ambient Effects

Mist
Stars (2.69)


Game Engine

Introduction

Introduction to the Game Engine
Game Logic Screen Layout

Logic

Logic Properties and States
The Logic Editor

Sensors

Introduction to Sensors
Sensor Editing
Common Options
-Actuator Sensor
-Always Sensor
-Collision Sensor
-Delay Sensor
-Joystick Sensor
-Keyboard Sensor
-Message Sensor
-Mouse Sensor
-Near Sensor
-Property Sensor
-Radar Sensor
-Random Sensor
-Ray Sensor
-Touch Sensor

Controllers

Introduction
Controller Editing
-AND Controller
-OR Controller
-NAND Controller
-NOR Controller
-XOR Controller
-XNOR Controller
-Expression Controller
-Python Controller

Actuators

Introduction
Actuator Editing
Common Options
-2D Filters Actuator
-Action Actuator
-Camera Actuator
-Constraint Actuator
-Edit Object Actuator
-Game Actuator
-Message Actuator
-Motion Actuator
-Parent Actuator
-Property Actuator
-Random Actuator
-Scene Actuator
-Sound Actuator
-State Actuator
-Steering Actuator
-Visibility Actuator

Game Properties

Introduction
Property Editing

Game States

Introduction

Camera

Introduction
Camera Editing
Stereo Camera
Dome Camera

World

Introduction

Physics

Introduction
Material Physics
No Collision Object
Static Object
Dynamic Object
Rigid Body Object
Soft Body Object
Vehicle Controller
Sensor Object
Occluder Object

Path Finding

Navigation Mesh Modifier

Game Performance

Introduction
System
Display
Framerate and Profile
Level of Detail

Python API

Introduction
Bullet physics
VideoTexture

Deploying

Standalone Player
Licensing of Blender Game

Android Support

Android Game development