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Mesh Primitives

Mode: Object mode

Hotkey: ⇧ ShiftA

Menu: Add » Mesh

A common object type used in a 3D scene is a mesh. Blender comes with a number of “primitive” mesh shapes that you can start modeling from.

Blender's ten standard primitives


Options included in more than one primitive are:

Radius
Sets the starting size for Circle, Cylinder, Cone, UVSphere and IcoSphere.
Depth
Sets the starting length for Cylinder and Cone.
Note about planar primitives
You can make a planar mesh three-dimensional by moving one or more of the vertices out of its plane (applies to Plane, Circle and Grid). A simple circle is actually often used as a starting point to create even the most complex of meshes.



Plane

A standard plane contains four vertices, four edges, and one face. It is like a piece of paper lying on a table; it is not a real three-dimensional object because it is flat and has no thickness. Objects that can be created with planes include floors, tabletops, or mirrors.

Cube

A standard cube contains eight vertices, twelve edges, and six faces, and is a real three-dimensional object. Objects that can be created out of cubes include dice, boxes, or crates.

Circle

A standard circle is comprised of n vertices. The number of vertices and radius can be specified in the context panel in the Tool Shelf which appears when the circle is created.

Vertices
The number of vertices that define the circle. The more vertices the circle contains, the smoother its contour will be; see (“Circles” obtained with various settings). In contrast, a circle with only 3 vertices is actually a triangle — the circle is actually the standard way of adding polygons such as triangles, pentagons, et cetera.
Radius
Sets the radius of the circle.
Fill Type
Set how the circle will be filled
Triangle Fan
Fill with triangular faces which share a vertex in the middle.
Ngon
fill with a single ngon
Nothing
Do not fill. Creates only the outer ring of vertices

UV Sphere

A standard UV sphere is made out of n segments and m rings. The level of detail and radius can be specified in the context panel in the Tool Shelf which appears when the UV sphere is created. Increasing the number of segments and rings makes the surface of the UV sphere smoother.

Segments
Number of vertical segments. Like Earth’s meridians, going pole to pole and
Rings
Number of horizontal segments. These are like Earth’s parallels.
Note
If you specify a six segment, six ring UVsphere you’ll get something which, in top view, is a hexagon (six segments), with five rings plus two points at the poles. Thus, one ring fewer than expected, or one more, if you count the poles as rings of radius 0.


Icosphere

An icosphere is a polyhedra sphere made up of triangles. The number of subdivisions and radius can be specified in the context panel in the Tool Shelf after the Icosphere is created. Icospheres are normally used to achieve a more isotropical and economical layout of vertices than a UV sphere.

Subdivisions
How many recursions are used to define the sphere. Increasing the number of subdivisions makes the surface of the Icosphere smoother. At level 1 the Icosphere is an icosahedron, a solid with 20 equilateral triangular faces. Any increasing level of subdivision splits each triangular face into four triangles, resulting in a more spherical appearance.
Size
The radius of the sphere.


Note
It is possible to add an icosphere subdivided 500 times. Adding such a dense mesh is a sure way to cause a program crash. An icosphere subdivided 10 times would have 5,242,880 triangles, so be very careful about this!


Cylinder

A standard cylinder is made out of n vertices. The number of vertices in the circular cross-section can be specified in the context panel in the Tool Shelf that appears when the object is created; the higher the number of vertices, the smoother the circular cross-section becomes. Objects that can be created out of cylinders include handles or rods.

Vertices
Then number of vertical edge loops used to define the cylinder.
Radius
Sets the radius of the cylinder.
Depth
Sets the height of the cylinder.
Cap Fill Type
Similar to circle (see above). When set to none, the created object will be a tube. Objects that can be created out of tubes include pipes or drinking glasses (the basic difference between a cylinder and a tube is that the former has closed ends).

Cone

A standard cone is made out of n vertices. The number of vertices in the circular base, dimensions and option to close the base of the cone can be specified in the context panel in the Tool Shelf that appears when the object is created; the higher the number of vertices, the smoother the circular base becomes. Objects that can be created out of cones include spikes or pointed hats.

Vertices
The number of vertical edge loops used to define the cone.
Radius 1
Sets the radius of the base of the cone.
Radius 2
Sets the radius of the tip of the cone. A value of 0 will produce a standard cone shape.
Depth
Sets the height of the cylinder.
Base Fill Type
Similar to circle (see above).

Torus

A doughnut-shaped primitive created by rotating a circle around an axis. The overall dimensions are defined by the Major and Minor Radius. The number of vertices (in segments) can be different for the circles and is specified in the context panel in the Tool Shelf with both radii (Major Segments and Minor Segments).

Major Radius
Radius from the origin to the center of the cross sections
Minor Radius
Radius of the torus's cross section
Major Segments
Number of segments for the main ring of the torus. If you think of a torus as a "spin" operation around an axis, this is how many steps in the spin.
Minor segments
Number of segments for the minor ring of the torus. This is the number of vertices of each circular segment.
Use Int+Ext Controls
Change the way the torus is defined:
Exterior Radius
When Use Int+Ext Controls is active, if viewed along the major axis, this is the radius from the center to the outer edge.
Interior Radius
When Use Int+Ext Controls is active, if viewed along the major axis, this is the radius of the hole in the center.

Grid

A standard grid is made out of n by m vertices. The resolution of the x-axis and y-axis can be specified in the context panel in the Tool Shelf which appears when the object is created; the higher the resolution, the more vertices are created. Example objects that can be created out of grids include landscapes (with the proportional editing tool or Displace modifier) and other organic surfaces. You can also obtain a grid when you create a plane and then use a subdivide modifier in Edit mode. However, there is a Landscape add-on available in the User Preferences.

X Subdivisions
The number of spans in the x direction. Minimum of 3, creating two face loops.
Y Subdivisions
The number of spans in the y direction.
Size
The length of the sides of the grid.

Monkey

This is a gift from old NaN to the community and is seen as a programmer’s joke or “Easter Egg”. It creates a monkey’s head once you press the Monkey button. The Monkey’s name is “Suzanne” and is Blender’s mascot. Suzanne is very useful as a standard test mesh, much like the Utah Tea Pot or the Stanford Bunny.

Add-ons

A few of the mesh primitives available as add-ons.


In addition to the basic geometric primitives, Blender has a constantly increasing number of script generated meshes to offer as pre-installed add-ons. These become available when enabled in the User Preferences' Add-ons section (filter by Add Mesh). Only a few are mentioned here:

Landscape
Adds a landscape primitive. Many parameters and filters appear in the Tool Shelf.
Pipe Joints
Adds one of five different pipe joint primitives. Radius, angle, and other parameters can be changed in the Tool Shelf.
Gears
Adds a gear or a worm with many parameters to control the shape in the Tool Shelf.



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User Manual

World and Ambient Effects

World

Introduction
World Background

Ambient Effects

Mist
Stars (2.69)


Game Engine

Introduction

Introduction to the Game Engine
Game Logic Screen Layout

Logic

Logic Properties and States
The Logic Editor

Sensors

Introduction to Sensors
Sensor Editing
Common Options
-Actuator Sensor
-Always Sensor
-Collision Sensor
-Delay Sensor
-Joystick Sensor
-Keyboard Sensor
-Message Sensor
-Mouse Sensor
-Near Sensor
-Property Sensor
-Radar Sensor
-Random Sensor
-Ray Sensor
-Touch Sensor

Controllers

Introduction
Controller Editing
-AND Controller
-OR Controller
-NAND Controller
-NOR Controller
-XOR Controller
-XNOR Controller
-Expression Controller
-Python Controller

Actuators

Introduction
Actuator Editing
Common Options
-2D Filters Actuator
-Action Actuator
-Camera Actuator
-Constraint Actuator
-Edit Object Actuator
-Game Actuator
-Message Actuator
-Motion Actuator
-Parent Actuator
-Property Actuator
-Random Actuator
-Scene Actuator
-Sound Actuator
-State Actuator
-Steering Actuator
-Visibility Actuator

Game Properties

Introduction
Property Editing

Game States

Introduction

Camera

Introduction
Camera Editing
Stereo Camera
Dome Camera

World

Introduction

Physics

Introduction
Material Physics
No Collision Object
Static Object
Dynamic Object
Rigid Body Object
Soft Body Object
Vehicle Controller
Sensor Object
Occluder Object

Path Finding

Navigation Mesh Modifier

Game Performance

Introduction
System
Display
Framerate and Profile
Level of Detail

Python API

Introduction
Bullet physics
VideoTexture

Deploying

Standalone Player
Licensing of Blender Game

Android Support

Android Game development