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Displacement

Implementation not finished yet, marked as experimental feature.

The shape of the surface and the volume inside its mesh may be altered by the displacement shaders. This way, textures can then be used to make the mesh surface more detailed.

Type

Selection 017.png

Depending on the settings, the displacement may be virtual, only modifying the surface normals to give the impression of displacement, known as bump mapping, or a combination of real and virtual displacement. The displacement type options are:

  • True Displacement: Mesh vertices will be displaced before rendering, modifying the actual mesh. This gives the best quality results, if the mesh is finely subdivided. As a result this method is also the most memory intensive.
  • Bump Mapping: When executing the surface shader, a modified surface normal is used instead of the true normal. This is a quick alternative to true displacement, but only an approximation. Surface silhouettes will not be accurate and there will be no self-shadowing of the displacement.
  • Displacement + Bump: Both methods can be combined, to do displacement on a coarser mesh, and use bump mapping for the final details.


Subdivision

Bump Mapped Displacement

Implementation not finished yet, marked as experimental feature.

When using True Displacement or Displacement + Bump and enabling Use Subdivision you can reduce the Dicing Rate to subdivide the mesh. This only affects the render and does not show in the viewport (but does show in Rendered Shading Mode). Displacement can also be done manually by use of the Displacement Modifier.

Subdivision Off - On, Dicing Rate 1.0 - 0.3 - 0.05 (Monkeys look identical in viewport, no modifiers)
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User Manual

World and Ambient Effects

World

Introduction
World Background

Ambient Effects

Mist
Stars (2.69)


Game Engine

Introduction

Introduction to the Game Engine
Game Logic Screen Layout

Logic

Logic Properties and States
The Logic Editor

Sensors

Introduction to Sensors
Sensor Editing
Common Options
-Actuator Sensor
-Always Sensor
-Collision Sensor
-Delay Sensor
-Joystick Sensor
-Keyboard Sensor
-Message Sensor
-Mouse Sensor
-Near Sensor
-Property Sensor
-Radar Sensor
-Random Sensor
-Ray Sensor
-Touch Sensor

Controllers

Introduction
Controller Editing
-AND Controller
-OR Controller
-NAND Controller
-NOR Controller
-XOR Controller
-XNOR Controller
-Expression Controller
-Python Controller

Actuators

Introduction
Actuator Editing
Common Options
-2D Filters Actuator
-Action Actuator
-Camera Actuator
-Constraint Actuator
-Edit Object Actuator
-Game Actuator
-Message Actuator
-Motion Actuator
-Parent Actuator
-Property Actuator
-Random Actuator
-Scene Actuator
-Sound Actuator
-State Actuator
-Steering Actuator
-Visibility Actuator

Game Properties

Introduction
Property Editing

Game States

Introduction

Camera

Introduction
Camera Editing
Stereo Camera
Dome Camera

World

Introduction

Physics

Introduction
Material Physics
No Collision Object
Static Object
Dynamic Object
Rigid Body Object
Soft Body Object
Vehicle Controller
Sensor Object
Occluder Object

Path Finding

Navigation Mesh Modifier

Game Performance

Introduction
System
Display
Framerate and Profile
Level of Detail

Python API

Introduction
Bullet physics
VideoTexture

Deploying

Standalone Player
Licensing of Blender Game

Android Support

Android Game development